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The Switch Pro Will Force Nintendo To Make Tough Decisions About The Future Of Gaming

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Nintendo Switch is updated to version 13.0.0 with support for Bluetooth audio and more

Much of the speculation regarding the Nintendo “Switch Pro” rumors takes care of the console’s graphical functions.

The switch that can produce 4K graphics when docked, even with Nvidia DLSS, is sure to appeal to fans waiting for the next Zelda Game or whatever Metroid Prime 4 will be. A stable frame rate of 60 fps for that New Pokémon game would be very grateful too, to be honest. This is an important question to ask if you’re someone considering spending at least another $ 300 on another console – but there’s an even bigger question that fans haven’t asked.

A small but significant factor in the Switch’s success story is not only the amazing games Nintendo put out on the system, but also how Nintendo’s relationships with third-party developers are re-established. Eternal Fate , Mortal Kombat , The Outside , and The Witcher 3 are just a few of the great third-party AAA games that have been given a Nintendo Switch port that runs natively on consoles. Visual results vary widely in most cases, but the fact that publishers are willing to make the investment necessary to port games from x86 to much weaker ARM-based systems shows the strength of the platform Nintendo Has built on.

There’s also a plus for gamers who always want to play these great games on the go without the need for a permanent internet connection, or for whom the Switch is their only gaming system, portable or otherwise.

However, the introduction of the PS5 and the new Xbox console changed Nintendo’s dynamics significantly. This system not only provides a significant performance increase but also represents a fundamental change in the way future games are made. The Switch platform is currently at a crossroads, and Pro is the perfect console to show Nintendo where it is headed if the company is to continue with relatively impressive third-party gaming support.

The problem is the switch memory. Specifically, the 32GB eMMC storage the console has shipped from day one (which can be expanded up to 2TB with a MicroSD card if that’s your bottleneck). Under optimal conditions, the fastest eMMC drives can reach speeds of approx. 400 MB / s. However, the Eurogamer Load timing check shows that the toggle drive is only slightly faster than the microSD card needed to expand the memory (approx. 100 MB / s). All of this means there’s no universe where Nintendo can natively support games based on the current Switch with a minimum SSD speed of at least 2 GB / s (SSD speed on the new Xbox console).

Some Sony titles, such as Ratchet and clink: Rift Apart, have left the hard drive speed limits behind. Its medium, currently time-controlled exclusivity on Xbox, forms the middle ground in today’s game development. Games can be run from a hard drive on a PC because, as Destructoid speculates, the game can count on the 8GB DRAM and 6GB VRAM listed in the minimum requirements if it turns out to be running from the hard drive – a luxury that the old console or the Switch can’t offer.

Nintendo has the option to fix its memory deficiency. The first is the most obvious: increase the speed of the Switch’s internal drives for the Switch Pro. UFS 3.1 is the best choice because it is very fast and works well with ARM processors. It offers read and write speeds similar to an Xbox drive to make it easier for developers to port next-generation games to the system to run natively. UFS 3.1 storage is more expensive than eMMC, however, which means Nintendo will have to charge a lot more for the Pro to make up for the hits on the edges. Another disadvantage of this option is its expandability. Just like the PS5 and Xbox series consoles, the UFS 3.1 switch can only play next-generation games outside of the internal storage. Nintendo had to find a new way to add storage space to the console because a microSD card wasn’t fast enough. This will likely come in the form of a proprietary memory card similar to the Xbox.

The problem with this solution is that the Switch is still a very high-income console without a refresher. Tens of millions of customers are still buying consoles and are showing no signs of slowing down. Running only next-generation games on the Switch Pro, which isn’t technically a new generation of consoles, will soon cut off most systems from next-generation gaming… amidst a huge sales boom.

With this, cloud gaming remains Nintendo’s only option for bringing next-generation games to the Switch without having to cut back on an older system. Nintendo is currently working with Ubitus, a Taiwanese company that operates servers that other companies can use as white-label cloud machines. Ubitus is already running Hitman 3 and controls for Nintendo and More games are being processed according to the company. Ubitus did not respond to a request for comment on this article.

Mike Fischer, CEO of Shadow, a remote PC gaming provider is optimistic about the use of a white label cloud gaming platform in direct-to-consumer offerings. Fisher told Entry, “The best thing about cloud gaming is that it breaks the hardware generation ‘upgrade cycle’.” As the burden of upgrading is shifted to the cloud and not to the end-user, a superior experience can always be provided. Even something as old as the Nintendo Switch.

According to Fischer and Shadow, the challenge of scaling cloud games to compete with native hardware is not capability, but capital. “This is a capital-intensive business. The challenge is that large tech companies with the capital to compete don’t have to have a distracting, agile mindset to win. However, nimble and annoying startups are required to raise the capital needed to finance scaling. “He is also optimistic about Ubitus’ future partnership with Nintendo, and the money available to Nintendo is certainly a big reason to be optimistic that cloud gaming on the Switch will actually improve over time – regardless of what promises are made.

reviews for now Available cloud editions are mixed. While the login delay should be good on both Hitman and control, there’s an issue with this compression artifact that can make more intense scenes look ugly. The biggest disadvantage, of course, is that for cloud gaming, the console should always have an internet connection (and a fast one). The speed at which developers move to the next generation of games means the number of third-party games they can buy without having to have WiFi will continue to decline over time when the gamer’s only console is a switch. This will make the switch an inherently less portable system.

It is possible that Nintendo uses both tools. Force older console owners to play cloud-based games and upgrade Switch Pro storage to UFS 3.1 so upgrading buyers can take advantage of native playback on the go.

If Nintendo just made cloud gaming the standard for AAA titles, the Switch Pro is just the system people buy to play the very best Nintendo games. It doesn’t always mean bad; t Game Your original sold better than ever and many people will buy Pro just to get Tom Nook 4K charming on their TV. But it will mark the end of a golden era for the Switch as an “all-around” machine.

I enjoy playing games, and gaming is a passion of mine. Among my favorite games are Tears of the Kingdom, GTA, and Cyberpunk.

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